Choking 101


CPR-bwOver the weekend, actually on our way home Elliot started to choke on corn chips he had eaten.   I was driving, but heard it same time my wife Debora did.  She keyed in on it and asked questions of him.  Elliot could not reply, but was gasping for air.

BANG….Medical Emergency in the back seat.  I saw him in the mirror and he was in distress.

The good thing was we were on surface streets and I started looking for a place to pullover.  I knew that I would be the one who would be performing the Heimlich Maneuver, very soon.  I needed a place that when I told Debora to call 911, that she would need to know where we were.  It was a new route to her.  Cell phone 911 calls don’t transmit the location.  Only landlines do that.  We were in a good populated part of town and on a main surface street.

Luckily for us, Elliot cleared the passageway himself.  He was sputtering and contents were urping out of his mouth.   I got him out of the car and had him stand-up and walk around.  I asked him several questions and he did reply.   I did this without having him drink water because if there was more down there, I didn’t what the water to re-clog it.

If your CPR/First Aid/AED certification is close to being out of date, get it.  If you don’t have it, get it.  If you do not have Wilderness First Aid, look into taking the course.  If it’s almost out of date, re-take it and take a buddy!

If you are in Scouting, there is a memo of understanding between the BSA and the Red Cross to provide training for $5.  Seeing that normal Red Cross CPR/AED/First Aid classes can run $90 and Wilderness First Aid $100 that is a bargain.  The Wilderness First Aid through the Wilderness Medical institute is $200, it’s even more of a bargain.

Please retweet, re-share and like this post.

<Update 9/9/13 @ 9:19pm PST>

It was pointed out to me that the BSA Agreement has certifications @$5 on Wilderness First Aid and that the Instructor needs be contacted to let them know what’s happening.  They may forgo the fee for the instruction.

Also the 911 via Cellphones.  All Cellphones are required to have a service to transmit the location. http://www.fcc.gov/guides/wireless-911-services  However, not all (from my understanding) 911 Call Centers are enabled to use that data.

Also Cell Towers, as it is pointed out in the above link, can place your signal . “While wireless phones can be an important public safety tool, they also create unique challenges for emergency response personnel and wireless service providers. Since wireless phones are mobile, they are not associated with one fixed location or address. While the location of the cell site closest to the 911 caller may provide a general indication of the caller’s location, that information is not usually specific enough for rescue personnel to deliver help to the caller quickly.”

Knowing where you are is important in a 911 situation.  It is understood that if you’re the patient you might not even remember your name when calling due to the accident.

About these ads

1 Comment

Filed under First Aid

One response to “Choking 101